White Columns

White Columns Online 'Liberate Soil' curated by Essye Klempner

Diana Artus
Robin Cameron
Deborah A Garwood
Fawn Krieger
Eric Legris

These artists work within grids or re-route the shapes within it, either spatially or temporally; like the Waze app, “outsmarting traffic,” users warn of potholes and police presence. From documenting cityscapes and parks within there is movement, a strategizing of forms and its containment, called the frame. 

 
[] [] []
[] [] []
[] [] etc.           counting windows from the buildings in Diana Artus' photographs. I imagine her traveling to cities, overlapping similarities.
 
Over a bowl of soup, Danyel stated:
Luxury apartment towers are already monuments to white supremacy...

and Paul insists on multiple tactics. 

With Robin Cameron’s year-long project, she is working through a lunar calendar of techniques and will install the plates in a grid format. One month is dedicated to using electrical currents in a salted bath: time shows its portrait etched into steel plates, as ink is left deep in the recesses that hold it.
 
In Fawn Krieger’s Experiment in Resistance, she pours concrete and presses in her hand-built clay blocks into a boxed frame—as they solidify as one. Brick, building, city, globe—an organism.
 
My friend, Bab, thinks we should break concrete to liberate soil. When upset, she has said that humans don’t deserve to live on this earth, and she is ready for our extinction.
 
The love of drawing comes through in all Eric Legris’ work, from his paintings to needlepoints. On the train, he sews yarns of color, through warp and weft- like the subway lines on a map, chomping across avenues and streets.
 
Deborah A Garwood’s photograph of Evan’s Pond, NJ shows the immediate beauty that nature holds, but most crucially, it could be part of a diagram of any of the cycles of life, such as carbon, oxygen, nitrogen, etc.—where cooperation is necessary.
 
“Nature nurtures life through communities. This is a process that started with the first single-celled organisms. Life, from its beginning more than three billion years ago, took over the planet by networking, not combat.” — Fritjof Capra*

Essye Klempner is the Program and Exhibitions Manager of EFA Robert Blackburn Printmaking Workshop.  She is an artist, co-founder of SEMINAR, and a member of artist collective, Underdonk.

This exhibition is the third in a series of online exhibitions; this exhibition was curated from White Columns' Artists Registry.

For more information: registry.whitecolumns.org

*https://greatergood.berkeley.edu/article/item/birds_do_it_bats_do_it

Diana Artus
Fortifications, ongoing since 2008
Photographs
variable size
Courtesy of the artist

Robin Cameron
Calendar Oeuvre - October 22, 2017
Steel plate with ink
12 x 12 in.
Courtesy of the artist

Fawn Krieger
Experiment in Resistance 4, 2017
Fired clay, underglaze, concrete, masonry pigment
12 x 9.5 x 2 in.
Courtesy of the artist

Eric Legris
Circles, 2016
Wool, polyester, cotton, aluminum, brass
12 x 22 in.
Courtesy of the artist

Deborah A Garwood
Evans Pond, Boathouse Side, May 25, 2016, 2016
Photograph
11 x 14 in.
Courtesy of the artist